12 thoughts on “(New) Jeannie Worsted Chemo Cap Patterns

  1. I had these patterns many years ago but I’ve started again to knit the caps as my 53 year old daughter is going through chemo for colon cancer. She won’t lose her hair but I see many others who have. Thanks for doing this.

    • Hi Patricia.

      I’m so sorry that your daughter was diagnosed with colon cancer and my prayers are with her for a very uneventful and full recovery/remission. So glad she won’t lose her hair but maybe a really good thing to do is to knit up one or two or a few chemocaps in honor of the wonderful care she is receiving and donating them to the cancer treatment center where she is receiving her chemo.

      As part of this program all we ask is that you
      Please put a little tag on each chemocap that says:
      ” Heather Spoll No Hair Day Hat Program”
      www,chemocaps.com
      knit for you by (your first name in honor of your daughter’s first name))

      This tag lets staff and patients know about the program and that it is a “real” program.
      This program is well known by oncology staff in cancer treatment centers.

      On behalf of every cancer patient who will be the recepient of one of your hand knit chemocaps, I say Thank You. You are making a real difference in the lives of cancer patients and your a wonderful person for participating. Give yourself a big pat on the back
      you deserve it.

      Ronni
      http://www.chemocaps.com

  2. Hi
    I’m looking for a Chemo cap pattern for yarn without stretch (cotton silk bamboo). Odd that all the chemo cap patterns are for wool … Must be a trifle hot indoor on a sensitive scalp .

    • Hi Carol.

      Chemocaps can be knit with any type yarn other than 100% wool because that would be too scratchy on a sensitive scalp. The goal for a chemocap is “warmth without weight”. Cancer patients who have lost their hair find their sensitive scalps to be cold.
      If your knitting for someone in the tropics somewhere in the world where the weather is hot then please substitute a yarn that would be soft such as you mentioned. If you do find a cotton, silk, bamboo, soy or other that has no stretch – pleae let me know because I haven’t found any. You could also downsize the needles and knit with a soft fingering/sock wt yarn and that would work really well.

  3. Hi, I am in the process of knitting the easy ribbed chemo cap and have run into a problem. I cannot figure out the decrease. It says to pattern 8 times, then k2 tog. No matter what I do it will not come out right. what am I doing wrong. thanks for the help

  4. Great pattern. I am making chemo hats for our local hospital. Like
    your pattern, but I am having problems understanding how to decrease.
    Pattern 8? Does that mean to k then knit 2 tog?
    Please simplifiy the decrease stitch.
    Thanks
    Nadine

    • Hi Nadine. I just heard back from Joanne, the designer of the pattern. Here is her answer to your question.

      The answer is:
      Work in pattern as established for 8 sts then work 2 sts together, repeat.
      On the next decrease row it will be work 7 sts in pattern as established, then work 2 sts together, repeat.

      This should solve the problem. Please let us know if you have any more difficulties and thank you for knitting chemocaps for cancer patients. On behalf of every patient who is the recepient of one of your chemocaps, please accept my heartfelt thank you.

      As part of this program all we ask is that you
      Please put a little tag on each chemocap that says:
      ” Heather Spoll No Hair Day Hat Program”
      www,chemocaps.com
      knit for you by (your first name or name of knitting group)

      This tag lets staff and patients know about the program and that it is a “real” program.
      This program is well known by oncology staff in cancer treatment centers.

      On behalf of every cancer patient who will be the recepient of one of your hand knit chemocaps, I say Thank You. You are making a real difference in the lives of cancer patients and your a wonderful person for participating. Give yourself a big pat on the back
      you deserve it.
      Ronni

    • Hi Judy
      Thanks for the input. We knitters are so lucky to have so many diversified fibers to knit with and chemocaps are beautifully knit in cotton, soy, bamboo, merino and wools that are less than 80%. The goal for a comfortable chemocap is “warmth without weight” so that no matter what climate the cancer patient lives in – from the coldest to the hottest their sensitive scalp will feel comforted with a soft chemocap.

      Thanks for participating in this program by knitting chemocaps for cancer patients.

      As part of this program all we ask is that you
      Please put a little tag on each chemocap that says:
      ” Heather Spoll No Hair Day Hat Program”
      www,chemocaps.com
      knit for you by (your first name or name of knitting group)
      This tag lets staff and patients know about the program and that it is a “real” program.
      This program is well known by oncology staff in cancer treatment centers.
      On behalf of every cancer patient who will be the recepient of one of your hand knit chemocaps, I say Thank You. You are making a real difference in the lives of cancer patients and your a wonderful person for participating. Give yourself a big pat on the back
      you deserve it.
      Ronni

  5. I have recently taken up knitting. I was at my son’s baseball game and a friend approached me and asked if I would make her a new night cap because the one that she had was making her head sweat at night. She told me about the Peaches and Cream 100% cotton yarn and my story begins from here. Once I completed the first night cap I had another request for one of my night caps. I am know hooked on helping cancer patients have a good night sleep. To know that in this small way that I am able to help makes it all worth it. Night caps made with love for another..

    • I think it’s wonderful that you want to knit “chemocaps” for cancer patients. I know the patients who are the recepients of your very soft handknit chemocaps will be very appreciative.
      Peaches and Cream yarn is meant to be used to knit dishcloths and if you can scrub a pot with it to clean it, then you know it isn’t right at all for a cancer patient. Patients who are losing or who have lost hair to cancer treatment have very sensitive scalps and they need a very soft washable chemocap to wear that will not be abrasive.
      Please use our patterns to knit chemocaps for cancer patients and use any yarn that has some wool in it but not 100% wool.
      I would save the peaches and cream for gifts of dishcloths but not for cancer patients chemocaps.

      Ronni

  6. Any worsted weight yarn can be used for chemo hats . I usually use 100% acryllic or a wool plend such as Plymouth Encore or Lion Brand Wool-Ese. 100% wool is too scratchy

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